Krustchinsky, Faletta Present Service-Learning Research in China

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Krustchinsky, Faletta Present Service-Learning Research in China
Dr. Rick Krustchinsky, professor of education, and Dr. Jean-Philippe Faletta, associate professor of political science and director of the Service Learning Program, recently attended the Fourth International Symposium on Service-Learning: Connecting the Global to the Local in Ningbo, China in September. The symposium was held at Ningbo Institute of Technology at Zhejiang University and was co-sponsored with the University of Indianapolis, Stellenbosch University in South Africa and Indiana Campus Compact.

Krustchinsky and Faletta presented a paper co-authored with Dr. Rogelio Garcia-Contreras and Service-Learning Coordinator, Theresa Heard. The paper will be submitted for inclusion as a chapter in the forthcoming publication Service-Learning in Higher Education: Connecting the Global to the Local (2012) by University of Indianapolis Press.

Representatives from universities around the globe came together to not only share their service-learning experiences and projects, but also to learn how they could expand their programs. Many universities are in the developmental stages of their service-learning programs.

“It was interesting to hear first-hand how many Chinese service-learning programs are in their infancy stage,” comments Dr. Faletta. “It’s exciting to see Chinese universities requesting assistance from other global higher education partners.”

New international service-learning connections and partnerships were made over the three-day conference and several attendees have reconnected via e-mail since returning.

“Attending the International Symposium on Service-Learning in Ningbo, China afforded me the opportunity to learn how universities throughout the world are utilizing service-learning as a model of teaching and as a reflective thinking tool for students,” Krustchinsky said. “Learning how others are using service-learning as a teaching strategy for connecting the global to the local was awe inspiring.”

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