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713-522-7911

Dr. Sujin Horwitz Associate Professor
Management & Marketing
713/525-2122
horwits@stthom.edu

Degrees

  • Doctor of Philosophy - Education-Work, Community & Family Education - University of Minnesota (2004)
  • Master of Arts - Human Resources & Industrial Relations - University of Minnesota (2000)

Publications

  • "Mosaic Mentoring for Healthcare Professionals: A Preliminary Literature Review"
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conferen (2014)
  • "Managing diversity through the lived experience of diversity trainers"
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conferen (2013)
  • "Knowledge sharing in global virtual team collaboration: Applications of CE and thinkLets"
    Knowledge Management Research & Practice
    "Although a global virtual team (GVT) can provide organizations with increased competitive advantages and greater flexibility due to its unique ability to transcend traditional boundaries of time, locations, and organizational constraints, knowledge sharing in globally dispersed and culturally diverse members also poses unique challenges to organizations wishing to capitalize on diverse knowledge of GVTs. This work, therefore, examines extant literature on collaboration engineering (CE) and thinkLets and further proposes that CE and thinkLets can help organizations develop predictable patterns of knowledge sharing behaviour and a sense of structure in GVT collaboration. Implications of using CE and thinkLets for organizational practice and research are also discussed in the virtual collaboration context."
    (2012) Vol. 10 Page 342-353
  • "Using Global Virtual Teams to Leverage Workforce Diversity in Global Environments"
    Although global virtual teams (GVTs) provide organizations with increased competitive advantages and greater flexibility due to their unique ability to transcend the traditional boundaries of time, locations, and organizational constraints, managing globally dispersed and culturally diverse GVTs also poses unique challenges to organizations wishing to capitalize on the potential benefits of GVTs. This work explores some of the challenges affecting GVTs by examining extant literature on team diversity, team conflict, and collaboration technology and further argues that organizations can greatly benefit from integrating the tenets of adaptable collaboration engineering technology and thinkLets into their GVT processes to develop predictable patterns of team collaboration and a sense of structure often lacking in the virtual team context.
    IGI Global (2012) Vol. 1
  • "The effects of virtualness and diversity on global virtual Teams: Collaboration technology for facilitating global virtual team process."
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conferen (2012)
  • "Small is Beautiful: Implications of Reliability and Statistical Power for Testing the Efficacy of HR Interventions"
    Human Resource Management
    "The development of optimal human resource practices is often contingent on the accurate statistical testing of potential interventions. Testing the efficacy of HR interventions can be enhanced by taking additional measures to improve statistical power, but the traditional means of increasing power through sample size are often beyond the cost and ability of HR professionals to pursue. This article, therefore, focuses on measurement procedures as an alternative way to increase statistical power for detecting HR intervention effects. Selection of reliable and appropriate measures and subsequent instrumentation are examined as effi cacious and cost-beneficial techniques that can be employed during the planning and designing stage of a study for augmenting statistical power to optimize business decision making."
    (2012) Vol. 51 Page 143-160
  • "Addressing dysfunctional relations among health care teams: Improving team cooperation through applied organizational theories"
    Previous research has demonstrated that communication failure and interpersonal conflicts are significant impediments among health-care teams to assess complex information and engage in the meaningful collaboration necessary for optimizing patient care. Despite the prolific research on the role of effective teamwork in accomplishing complex tasks, such findings have been traditionally applied to business organizations and not medical contexts. This chapter, therefore, reviews and applies four theories from the fields of organizational behavior (OB) and organization development (OD) as potential means for improving team interaction in health-care contexts. This study is unique in its approach as it addresses the long-standing problems that exist in team communication and cooperation in health-care teams by applying well-established theories from the organizational literature. The utilization and application of the theoretical constructs discussed in this work offer valuable means by which the efficacy of team work can be greatly improved in health-care organizations.
    Emerald Group Publishing (2011) Vol. 10 Page 173-197
  • "Improving health care quality through culturally competent physicians: leadership and organizational diversity training"
    Journal of Healthcare Management
    (2011) Vol. 2011 Page 29-40
  • "Critical Review of the Effects of Bureaucratic Structure on Ethical Accountability"
    This paper focuses on the effects that large organizational structures have on primary ethical choices and accountability. Particularly, large bureaucratic structures were critiqued as inefficient means for monitoring unethical acts by agents and assigning true responsibility to individual behavior. In doing so, Donaldson’s framework (1982) was adopted in analyzing the effects of bureaucracy on ethical decision making and accountability. This paper further elaborates on areas where the bureaucratic structure creates accountability problems, provides examples and consequences, and offers possible solutions to the problem.
    AHRD Conference Proceedings (2011)
  • "The effects of affective commitment and empowerment on patient safety culture."
    This study investigates a crucial link between patient safety culture and two employee attitudinal constructs, the affective component of organizational commitment and empowerment, as means by which to promote patient safety culture in health care organizations. Despite the wide recognition of the importance of employee empowerment and commitment in organizational outcomes in Human Resource Development (HRD) research, the examination of the two constructs in health care settings is rather scarce and health care researchers have recently begun to explore their effects on patient safety culture. The implications of the study's findings for future work are also discussed.
    AHRD Conference Proceedings (2011)
  • "Improving surgical resident training through use of the NEO Five Factor Personality Inventory: Results from a cohort-based trial."
    American Journal of Surgery
    "BACKGROUND: This study uses the NEO-Five Factor Personality Inventory (NEO) to assess its value in identifying resident educational needs. METHODS: A cohort of surgical residents (n = 65) were administered the NEO. Statistical analysis compared the results between previously determined national norms and between varying resident demographics. RESULTS: The resident scores of Extroversion, Openness, and Conscientiousness were significantly higher than those of the US population and Agreeableness was significantly lower. By gender, only Agreeableness was statistically higher for female residents. The mean Extroversion score for residents who were postgraduate years (PGYs) 3 to 5 was significantly higher than that of PGYs 1 to 2. Further subanalyses were conducted on each primary component. CONCLUSIONS: The NEO was valuable for identifying areas where training could be especially useful to augment Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. The use of this test on resident populations could be of significant value for tailoring comprehensive surgical leadership education programs."
    (2010) Vol. 201 Page 828-834
  • "Reliability, statistical power, cost optimization: Implications for human resources interventions."
    The development of optimal human resource (HR) practices is often contingent on the accurate statistical testing of potential interventions. Tests of strategic initiatives can be enhanced by taking additional measures to improve statistical power but the traditional means of increasing power through sample size are often beyond the cost and ability of HR professionals to pursue. This paper, therefore, focuses on measurement procedures as an alternative way to increase statistical power for detecting intervention effects. Selection of reliable and appropriate measures and subsequent instrumentation are examined as efficacious and cost-beneficial techniques that can be employed during the planning and designing stage of a study for augmenting statistical power to optimize business decision-making.
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conferen (2009)

Presentations

  • "Effects of Functional Diversity on Team-Based Projects: A Review of the Literature" (2014)
    Academy of International Business U.S. Southwest Chapter Annual Conference
  • "Mosaic Mentoring for Healthcare Professionals: A Preliminary Literature Review" (2014)
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conference
    Research paper presentation by the author
  • "Managing diversity through the lived experience of diversity trainers" (2013)
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conference
    Research paper presentation by the author
  • "An integrative review of effects of emotions on escalation of commitment: Past, present, and future" (2012)
    Asia Academy of Management Conference
  • "HR careers in the global economy" (2012)
    Lecture in the Dept. of Vocational Education
  • "The effects of virtualness and diversity on global virtual teams: Collaboration technology to facilitate global virtual team processes." (2012)
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conference
    Research paper presentation by the authors
  • "Managing patient and team diversity in clinical practice: Improving healthcare quality through culturally competent leadership" (2011)
    Academy of International Business U.S. Southwest Chapter Annual Conference
  • "The effects of affective commitment and empowerment on patient safety culture" (2011)
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conference
    Research paper presentation by the authors
  • "Critical Review of the Effects of Bureaucratic Structure on Ethical Accountability" (2011)
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conference
    Research paper presentation by the authors
  • "Improving Resident Training through the Use of NEO-PI-R:Results from a Cohort-Based Trial" (2010)
    Western Academy of Management Conference
  • "Developing Structure in the Uncertain Environment: How Virtual Teams Can Benefit from Collaboration Engineering" (2010)
    Western Academy of Management Conference
    In recent years, the use of teamwork has become a popular trend adopted by organizations throughout the world. Moreover, the information age provides organizations with technologies that promise cost reductions, efficiency and highly skilled employees without geographical and time barriers. In fact, communication technologies have enabled hybrid teams to work together in geographically dispersed locations and these are commonly known as virtual teams. Although virtual teams promise advantages that organizations are willing to explore and exploit, these teams are not exempt from potential disadvantages and therefore pose unique challenges to organizations. A closer examination of the differences between virtual and conventional teams can give the reader a notion of difficulties and challenges inherent in virtual teamwork. Among them, the most substantial one may be the fact that virtual teams rarely, if at all, meet face to face, which presents managers and Human Resource staff a host of questions regarding how virtual collaboration should occur to facilitate teamwork—how can a group of people meet and work toward a common goal if they do not know or see each other? How can the group develop a sense of trust toward each other? Furthermore, how will the development of shared understanding come to be in order to fulfill the task? This workshop explores the aforementioned questions and further proposes to borrow the idea behind collaborative engineering, particularly the use of ThikLets, in order to develop cohesion, deliver results and evaluate team member performance in virtual team settings.
  • "TARGETING EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTIONS TO ENHANCE THE ACGME CORE COMPETENCIES USING THE NEO-5-FACTOR PERSONALITY INVENTORY" (2009)
    Academic Surgical Congress Conference
    Background: The ACGME has recognized the areas of professionalism, interpersonal communication skills and patient care to be three of the primary core competencies to be essential components of a comprehensive surgical education. A significant number of studies have borne out that enhancement in these areas lead to a reduction in medical errors, decreased ambiguity in communication, greater patient compliance, and overall improvement in medical care. However, while surgeon personality has been studied using various psychometric tests, the focus of such research has been almost exclusively for determining sub-specialty choice and not on improved performance. Our research refocused the study of surgeon personality as a means of identifying areas that would specifically augment the ACGME competencies most in need of intervention. Methods: Following IRB approval, a surgical resident cohort was administered the NEO-5-Factor Personality Inventory. The inventory, consisting of 240 items, is considered the gold standard by psychologists by which the strengths and weaknesses that groups can be assessed, and educational interventions designed. The five general areas of personality assessed are Neuroticism that measures emotional instability and self-consciousness factors; Extroversion that measures outgoing and personable factors; Openness that measures values and creative factors; Conscientiousness that measures competence and dutifulness factors; and Agreeableness that measures trust and comfort with social interaction factors. Each of these areas is comprised of sub-scales which were likewise analyzed in the study. Statistical comparison to national norms was conducted. Results: 65 residents completed the survey of which 43 (66%) were male and 22 (34%) female. The mean age of the residents was 29.0 years (SD = 3.0). PGY was dichotomized into junior residents (PGY 1 & 2) n = 39 (60%), and senior residents (PGY 3-5) n = 26 (40%). For the resident cohort as a whole, a series of t-tests found they were significantly higher in Extroversion (t = 4.9, p <0.001), Openness (t = 2.5, p < 0.05) and Conscientiousness (t = 2.4, p <0.05), and significantly lower in Neuroticism (t = 13.2, p <0.001) and Agreeableness (t= 2.7, p<0.01) compared to previous findings of the national population. For all factors, no significant differences were found by gender except for Agreeableness, in which the female were significantly higher than their male counterparts (t = 2.1, p < 0.05). No statistically differences were found by PGY year, with the exception of the Extroversion factors, in which senior PGY’s had significantly higher scores than the junior PGY’s (t = 2.0, p<0.05). Conclusion: The NEO found that as a whole, the residents were higher than average in the areas of Extroversion, Openness and Conscientiousness, and lower in Neuroticism and Agreeableness than the national average. The lower scores in Agreeableness in particular demonstrates that educational interventions aimed at improving social interactions in the areas of eliciting trust and comfort with patients may be particularly valuable. Extroversion increasing with PGY years may likely be due to increased experience and skill through the surgical training process and is indicative of success in this area of surgical education. Overall, this study demonstrates that the NEO can be highly useful for targeting educational interventions that effectively augment ACGME core competencies among surgical residents.
  • "ASSESSMENT OF CROSS-CULTURAL TRAINING NEEDS AMONG SURGICAL RESIDENTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR SURGICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUMS" (2009)
    Academic Surgical Congress Conference
    Background: The importance of optimizing medical care to patients of different cultures is an increasingly important skill in medicine. Prior research has demonstrated that the ability of physicians to acquire cross-cultural skills affect the quality of health outcomes. Additionally, the ACGME has established interpersonal communication, professionalism through sensitivity and responsiveness to diverse patient populations, and patient care as three essential core competencies. This study examined a surgical resident cohort to identify training needs for improving surgical care among culturally diverse racial and ethnic populations. Methods: Following IRB protocol approval, and obtaining permission from the survey developers, a modified version of the Residency Training in Cross-Cultural Survey (Betancourt and Weissman, 2003) was administered to 63 surgical residents. An additional survey obtained data on the residents’ gender and PGY to be assessed in conjunction with the Cross Cultural Survey. Results: Of the respondents, 47 (75%) were male and 16 (25%) were female, with the average age being 29.9 years of age (SD = 2.8). The PGY groups were dichotomized into junior residents consisting of PGY’s 1 and 2 (n = 28, 44%) and senior residents of PGY’s 3-5 (n =35, 56%). Of those surveyed, 58 (92%) chose to report their ethnicities. While the vast majority of residents (95%) indicated that it was important to consider the patient’s culture in providing care, those who were of non-Caucasian ethnicity scored significantly higher than Caucasians on the importance of considering a patients culture when providing care (t = 2.47, p < .05). There were no significant differences between the junior and senior PGY groups regarding the importance of considering the patient’s culture when providing care (t = .06, p = .95) and the importance of practicing in a culturally diverse patient mix (t = .44, p = .66). Similarly female residents did not differ significantly from males regarding these two aspects of cross cultural care (t = .99, p = .32, t = 1.36, p = .18, respectively). Many of the residents indicated that difficulties in understanding different cultures resulted in longer office visits (35%), unnecessary office visits (19%), delays in obtaining informed consent (40 %) and patient noncompliance (19.0%). Residents with two or more mentors adept in providing cross-cultural care scored significantly higher than respondents having only one mentor on the importance of considering the patients culture when providing care (t = 3.21, p < .01) and on the importance of practicing in a diverse racial and ethnic patient mix (t =2.31, p < .05). Almost half of the residents (47%) felt they were unprepared to treat patients who are new immigrants and about a quarter (24%) indicated they were unprepared to deal with those holding beliefs at odds with Western medicine. Conclusion: The results indicate that resident training in cross cultural care should be included in surgical educational curriculums. Many residents indicated that important areas of patient care could be improved with a greater understanding of patient diversity. Of particular note was the importance of multiple mentors in providing leadership training in such areas and should thus be included as an important part of surgical education. Increasing the interaction between ethnically diverse residents may also increase sensitivity to the care of patients from differing cultural backgrounds.
  • "Reliability, statistical power, cost optimization: Implications for human Resource interventions." (2009)
    The Academy of Human Resource Development Conference
    The development of optimal human resource (HR) practices is often contingent on the accurate statistical testing of potential interventions. Tests of strategic initiatives can be enhanced by taking additional measures to improve statistical power but the traditional means of increasing power through sample size are often beyond the cost and ability of HR professionals to pursue. This paper, therefore, focuses on measurement procedures as an alternative way to increase statistical power for detecting intervention effects. Selection of reliable and appropriate measures and subsequent instrumentation are examined as efficacious and cost-beneficial techniques that can be employed during the planning and designing stage of a study for augmenting statistical power to optimize business decision-making.
  • "Reliability, statistical power and cost optimization: Implications for strategic human resource interventions" (2009)
  • "Targeting educational interventions to enhance the ACGME core competencies using the NEO-5-factor personality" (2009)
    Academic Surgical Conference
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