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FC 5301 - Faith and Dominant American Culture
Faith and Culture
This course seeks to develop an appreciation of the strengths and challenges of the dominant American way of life as embodied in the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. It studies the roots of the American republic and the formulation of its worldview: its principal values, representative character types, codes of behavior, institutions and symbols. It then views these through the lens of the Gospel worldview in the Catholic tradition. The course is designed to lead students to appreciate what it means to be faithful citizens, American Catholics, enabling them to bring the Catholic voice into civic and political discourse that seeks the good in common.


FC 5302 - Christian Anthropology
Faith and Culture
Based on the understanding of the human person as it is articulated in the Second Vatican Council's Pastoral Constitution of the Church in the Modern World and subsequent papal teaching, this course examines the constitutive elements of the human person created in the image and likeness of God. The course reflects on creation, grace, sin, freedom and the communitarian destiny of humankind. The course then will contrast this revealed understanding of persons in community with some of the philosophical understandings of the human person which underlie American individualism.


FC 5303 - Virtue: Personal and Civic
Faith and Culture
American political life in attempting to separate religion from politics has at times tried to separate politics from ethics and the development of virtue. The first part of this course will argue that such a separation, however well intentioned, cannot sustain effective civic life and in fact runs the risk of falling into authoritarianism. In classical and medieval times and in the formation of the United States of America, certain personal virtues have been thought to be the foundation for a healthy civic and political life. This course will consider how those virtues still constitute that foundation. The course will show how various political theories are based in suppositions about human nature, and examine those suppositions critically.


FC 5304 - Christian Spiritual Journey in the American Context
Faith and Culture
This course seeks to give the student a framework for living, as Americans, life in Christ which is rooted in Scripture and the Tradition of the Church. Special attention will be given to identifying major areas of contrast between the American way of life and the Gospel call to spiritual transformation. Taking Christ’s prayer “…that they all may be one…” as the goal of all Christian living, the course seeks to understand the process of transformation that we are urged by St. Paul to undergo when he says “…do not model your behavior on the contemporary world, but let the renewing of your minds transform you, so that you may discern for yourselves what is … good and acceptable and mature.


FC 5305 - Mission of the Church
Faith and Culture
This course presents the origins of the Church in the mission of the Messiah, and the development of Christian understanding of the mystery of the Church. Special attention is given to the ecclesiology of Vatican II: the mystery of the Church with its hierarchical and charismatic gifts, the communion of saints, the Catholic Church’s commitment to ecumenism and religious liberty, and the mission of the Church today. Some consideration will also be given to Catholic social teaching as an articulation of the Church’s mission.


FC 5306 - Art & Asceticism of Dialogue
Faith and Culture
The only means for the Church to evangelize is through dialogue with the world (John Paul II Redemptor Hominis). The Church and Christians therefore must be masters of dialogue. This course will focus on developing those oral communication attributes and skills that are essential for understanding how the Catholic voice can be heard in bringing the Good News of the Gospel into public moral discourse.


FC 5307 - Ecclesiology
Faith and Culture
This course explores the mystery of the Church as prefigured in Israel and constituted in the ministry of Christ, the historical development of the Church’s order and self-understanding, the ecclesiological doctrine of Vatican II, ecumenism and the quest for full Christian unity, the mission of the Church in the contemporary world, and the significance of Mary as symbol, mother, and model of the Church.


FC 6320 - American Catholicism
Faith and Culture
This course provides an introduction to the history of the Catholic Church in the United States. The course will concentrate upon the creation and development of ecclesiastical structures within a democratic environment and the assimilation of the large immigrant population into the American Church. In addition, the course will emphasize the key social, political, ethical, and doctrinal issues observable in the development of the American Church.


FC 6321 - Bill of Rights
Faith and Culture



FC 6322 - Family in America
Faith and Culture



FC 6323 - Christ and the Moral Life
Faith and Culture
This course provides a study of Catholic social ethics that begins with its basis and foundation in both the Old and New Testaments, including its close connection with Christian virtue ethics, and then moves to examine modern papal social encyclicals as well as the U. S. Bishops’ major pastoral letters “The Challenge of Peace” and “Economic Justice For All.” The course aims to deal with the question of how future ministers can prepare to teach and preach about social justice and how one might best foster a spirituality of social care and responsibility.


FC 6323 - Justice: Individual and Social
Faith and Culture
This course provides a study Catholic social ethics that begins with its basis and foundation in both the Old and New Testaments, including its close connection with Christian virtue ethics, and then moves to examine modern papal social encyclicals as well as the U. S. Bishops’ major pastoral letters “The Challenge of Peace” and “Economic Justice For All.” The course aims to deal with the question of how future ministers can prepare to teach and preach about social justice and how one might best foster a spirituality of social care and responsibility.


FC 6324 - Faith and Culture in Biblical Texts
Faith and Culture
Faith and Culture in Biblical Texts


FC 6325 - Ecumenism and Interreligious Dialogue
Faith and Culture
This course will focus on the Church’s dialogue with other Christian Churches, ecclesial communities and world religions. It will allow the student to appropriate Church teaching as contained in Church Documents (Unitatis Redintegratio; Nostra Aetate; Orientalium Ecclesiarum; Dominus Iesus; Ut Unum Sint, subsequent Papal documents and statements from the Diacastery for Ecumenical and Interfaith dialogue). The course will also expose students to the major accomplishments that have resulted from dialogue between the Catholic Church and other mainline denominations. Students will be exposed to various levels and types of dialogue and be given practical opportunities to experience them. Finally, students will consider the implications of collaboration in what scholars refer to as the “Public Church”.


FC 6326 - Christian Leadership
Faith and Culture



FC 6340 - VISION OF THE SECOND VAT COUNCIL
Faith and Culture



FC 6350 - Institutions and Associations in a Democratic Republic: The Way to Authentic Personhood
Faith and Culture



FC 6351 - Education and Evangelization
Faith and Culture



FC 6352 - Democracy in America: Journey and Genius of Alexis de Tocqueville
Faith and Culture
This course will consider the various aspects of democracy and republicanism, especially through the American experience since 1776. Most of the course will revolve around a very close reading of de Tocqueville’s masterpiece, Democracy in America, yet it will also draw upon the insights of Edmund Burke and Robert Nesbit. Topics of discussion will include: revolutionary violence; community norms; individual and natural rights; religion as the basis of culture. This course will be offered online primarily using the Blackboard platform as well as video-conferencing for a mixture of live lecture and discussion. Students are required to have a broadband internet connection, a Skype account, and a webcam in order to take the class. All students will log-on according to the course schedule.


FC 6354 - Faith and Science
Faith and Culture
There is growing interest in the relationship between science and religion especially because scientific knowledge has grown exponentially over the past half century. Though they will never converge completely, there is fascinating evidence from the far reaches of the outer universe to the inner workings of the atom that bear striking analogies to theistic religious beliefs. There will be a discussion of the four ways that science and religion can relate: conflict, independence, dialogue, and integration. This course will emphasize the dialogue approach starting with the perspective of the awe of scientists when they made their discoveries. It will be made accessible in language that non-scientists can understand. A dialogue will then ensue on the analogies of those discoveries to theistic religious beliefs with particular emphasis on Christianity and Catholicism. Students will be encouraged to draw their own informed conclusions. The course will begin with assumptions and then propose convergence trends in four broad categories: physics to metaphysics, chemistry to life, biology to consciousness and psychology to mysticism. A mindful discussion of the science of the brain will coincide with the potential heartfelt experience of mysticism. The course is intended for students pursuing an M.A. degree in Faith and Culture (MAFC). It is also meant for non-scientists desiring to understand the consistency of their faith with modern science, scientists and engineers seeking to incorporate their faith into a consistent worldview, and clergy interested in using science in homilies. The objective of the course is for students to have a better understanding of how faith and science in recent times have come to be mutually affirming over a broad range of disciplines including physics, chemistry, biology, and psychology.


FC 6355 - Faith and Hispanic Cultures within the American Context
Faith and Culture
This course will focus on the increasing impact that Hispanic/Latino cultures and spirituality are having on US society. In the 2010 census, Hispanics now constitute 38% of the Texas population. In contrast to the typical rendering of the United States and the spread of European-American culture as an east to west wave from the 1600s to the present, this course will suggest the implications of the simultaneous spread of Latin American culture in its diverse forms, as a south to north wave from 1492 to the present. In particular, we will focus on the roots of the Latino spiritual imagination both in Latin American theology and popular religion and explore how this understanding of God, the person in community, and the world is renewing the communitarian dimension of both US politics and US Catholicism. In addition to considering the growing impact of Hispanic/Latino cultures on US politics and public policy, the course will explore the challenges of bridging multiple cultures in parishes and transforming educational practices to manifest this ethos of “crossing borders.”


FC 6356 - Faith and Economics
Faith and Culture
This course aims to equip students to identify issues of economic justice and then define effective paths of proper conduct and just action. In this sense the course has two objectives. The first is to develop a broader vision and deeper understanding of economic justice issues in America. The second is more practical; it is to put students within case study situations where they must confront the complexities of economic justice and attempt to devise effective action plans. To achieve these objectives, the course will employ a combination of readings and lectures, plus student projects and case studies. Three sources provide the motivation for this course. First, many people of faith are deeply aware of the economic injustices that exist in American society. By better understanding the Catholic faith's social justice doctrines and also, the objectives and proper workings of the market economy, a broader, deeper framework will emerge for addressing economic justice issues within the American culture. A second motivation comes from the intensifying cycle of economic scandal which has inflicted the American economy from 1987-present. This course will provide a diagnosis of this cycle and how this points to new frontiers for economic justice activism. The final motivation involves a perception that people of faith often enter their professional lives unprepared for the tensions they will encounter. This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to prepare for such conflicts between their faith and their work life, and practice in advance how to work through the difficulties they present.


FC 6358 - Peace Making
Faith and Culture



FC 6359 - Catholic Teachings on Education
Faith and Culture
A graduate seminar on the special role of Catholic school teachers in spiiritual development through an exploration of Church teachings on education.


FC 6360 - Roman Catholic Perspective on Ecumenical & Interreligious Movements
Faith and Culture
The course, which is in English, is for men and women who are in preparation for ministry or religious life, who are in the mission field, who are ecumenical officers or members of ecumenical commissions, or who are looking for a sabbatical experience led by qualified professors and ecumenists.


FC 6392 - Independent Study
Faith and Culture
Supervised work done under the direction of a faculty member of the department. Permission of the chair required.


FC 6393 - Special Topics
Faith and Culture



FC 6393 - Special Topics
Faith and Culture



FC 6399 - Service Learning and Leadership Practicum
Faith and Culture
The MAFC Program requires that all candidates of the MA degree complete a Service-Learning and Leadership Practicum as a final component of their degree program. This practicum is designed to provide the candidate with the opportunity to integrate and apply, in practical terms, their learning gained throughout the MAFC curriculum. Candidates, in collaboration with an approval of the MAFC Program Director and Site Supervisors, will develop projects in which they will show how they will work in various settings and with various groups to communicate and instruct others how to integrate faith development with civic and social responsibility. The object of the project is to enhance the life of people of faith through the service provided by the candidates. At the end of their project, candidates will provide the MAFC Program Director with a self-evaluation and the evaluation of their performance given by their Site Directors.


FC 6493 - ST. Triune God
Faith and Culture



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